Toronto Beyblade Burst Tournament Report: U wot m8?! LMAO's Burstday Beynanza

TORONTO BEYBLADE BURST
TOURNAMENT REPORT:
U Wot m8?! LMAO’s Burstday Beynanza!

June 24, 2017 at High Park in Toronto, Ontario Canada • BURST FORMAT
OFFICIAL EVENT PAGE • RESULTS SPREADSHEET Coming Soon

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The best thing about this event was the fact that LMAO couldn’t make it even though it was named after him hahaha. Still, it was a fun day! Although, Drain Fafnir (4 Glaive Atomic, to be specific) was utterly dominant generally speaking.

The most painful lesson I learned on this particular day was that Spread Revolve does not have as good stamina as 4 Glaive Atomic. Cost me my finals battle versus Mitsu, basically. However, I did somehow put up a fight and ended up only losing 5-4. I hadn’t realized this before because people originally flocked to using Polish on Atomic instead of 4 Glaive, which has much better stamina with a small trade off in life-after-death potential. That said, I haven’t tested things like 4 Glaive Revolve versus 4 Glaive Atomic.

I’ll have a video up on Beyblade Channel someday, but you can get a sense for the combos used in these photos from the Deck Format finals:

Deck Format Finals
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Video More Deck Photos (Click to View)

However, even this is deceiving because a couple of the final battles ended up turning into dF.4G.At mirror matches. I knew this would happen and was actively trying to combat this by using a aC.P.At instead in my Deck, but for some reason it wasn’t OSing Mitsu’s dF.4G.At in our match (I picked Polish as I figured it would give me more life after death). Then, as previously mentioned, I found that dF.S.R couldn’t OS it consistently either (funnily enough, afterwards 1234beyblade and I found that Yell had a slightly better chance in that match up).

In some ways, I feel like this is the worst way to lose an event; you understand well what the metagame is going to be like at an event and want to do something to combat it so you’re not playing mirror matches … then you lose because you tried something different and the people who win are those that go with the flow and use what is considered the ‘best’ in that moment.

There’s a valuable lesson in there with regards not only to Beyblade, but all competitive games; you can try to be ‘creative’ as much as you’d like, but if you want to win, you pick what wins. There is certainly room for ‘creativity’ in a game that is evolving or unexplored in some areas–and I don’t mean to squash the spirit of experimentation in any way–but to pull something like that off you have to be as close to 100% sure and confident in what you’re doing as possible. In my case, my ‘creative’ solution of aC.P.At and dF.S.R was clearly misinformed even if only slightly, so while I was upset with myself (only for not testing more), I could only accept the loss, learn from it, and move on to the next event (which I ultimately won on July 9th at Rowdy in the Dish)! :)

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That said, there was two other aspects of this event which were harder to accept. I mainly wanted to bring them up for their value especially to all Organizers and judges at our events:

1. Seeding
The first one–which is relevant to all WBO Organizers–was the seeding in this event. While random seeding is permitted in tournaments with less than 17 players, it is mandatory for events above that.

In this Swiss Format tournament, the seeding was handled mostly correctly, but unfortunately some players were added to the participants list in Challonge late and were mistakenly not moved up into their properly seeded position. As the bottom seeds, they were given an easier path through the five rounds of Swiss, eventually ending with a much lower Bucholz score than any of the other finalists. And this wasn’t noticed until a couple rounds had already been played, so there was no turning back.

The negative effect this has on the entire event and all participants is enormous. Random seeding is one thing; it’s random so whatever happens is based on that void of logic. But when seeding is only partially completed and there are a few outliers who end up as bottom seeds when they should have been much higher, it puts all higher seeds in the event at a huge disadvantage because they are given an appropriately increasingly difficult path as the Swiss rounds progress if they continue to win, while lower seeds even if they win will typically not face the highest seeded players until the very end.

Lower seeds may even get a bye in one round, allowing them a better chance at an undefeated record. Usually this doesn’t matter because low seeds do not typically perform well enough to make a final, but when it’s a player who should actually be a higher seed, it becomes unfair.

Ultimately, the bottom seeds (who should have been seeded higher) end up with a very low Bucholz score because they played opponents who are also lower seeded, and then the lower seed players end up with some of the highest Bucholz in the event because they played those bottom seed players who were actually more skilled.

I just wanted to bring this up to remind people how important seeding is. Please make sure you do it right!

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2. Spinning/Rotating vs. Rolling
In my battle versus Mitsu where he was using Drain Fafnir 4 Glaive Atomic and I was using Guardian Kerbeus Spread Revolve. As expected there were several very, very close calls throughout the match. She ended up winning 3-1.

However, I contended with the judge in at least one round that Drain Fafnir was “rolling” and not “spinning”, therefore it should not have been called a win in its favour. When I tried to explain this, it became apparent that our individual interpretations of what those two words mean and how they should be enforced in practice differed.

In our rulebooks it states:

WBO Official Rulebooks - Gameplay Appendix Wrote:Spinning

A Beyblade is still considered to be spinning as long as it is visibly rotating. Some Beyblades have parts that allow the upper half to continue rotating after the bottom half has stopped; these are still considered to be spinning. Once a Beyblade stops spinning, the round ends. If a Beyblade starts spinning again after it has stopped, the round does not resume.

The key part here is “a Beyblade is still considered to be spinning as long as it is visibly rotating” (another point that is unrelated to this dispute, but still important to understand is that it doesn’t say “full rotation” anywhere). So, what is rotating?:

(Jun. 25, 2017  1:09 AM)jameschaos Wrote: rotation: noun
1. the act of rotating; a turning around as on an axis.

roll·ing adjective
adjective: rolling
1. moving by turning over and over on an axis.

There is a fine line here, but to me there is a difference. But it’s difficult to explain in words without being able to show someone. At the very end of a battle If a Beyblade looks like it is still spinning as it normally would while totally upright at the beginning of a battle, then that should be counted as “spinning” even when it starts to scrape the floor. But if at the very end of a battle a Beyblade is resting on its side and moving across the stadium without turning around on its axis, that is “rolling” by my estimation. It’s very tricky to see in practice because in left versus right-spin battles in particular we are talking about fractions of a second and sometimes the movement of a Beyblade just before it loses all energy can mistaken as a rotation, when in my opinion it is not.

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More Photos (Click to View)



Winning Combinations

1st: Mitsu
Drain Fafnir 4 Glaive Atomic
Drain Fafnir Polish Atomic

2nd: SUGOI-KONICHEWA
Acid Anubis Spread Revolve
Blaze Ragnaruk 2 Glaive Atomic

3rd: jameschaos
Drain Fafnir Spread Revolve
Drain Fafnir 2 Glaive Revolve
Drain Fafnir 2 Glaive Atomic (Deck Format Finals Only)
Neptune Heavy Hold (Deck Format Finals Only)



Thanks for reading! If you have any questions about this event, please feel free to post below!

More Toronto Beyblade Tournament Reports
If you enjoyed this report, then you may also enjoy some of my other Toronto Beyblade Burst tournament reports:
I feel free to post below
(Jul. 30, 2017  5:07 AM)1234beyblade Wrote: I feel free to post below

Thanks for your thoughts!
(Jul. 30, 2017  5:07 AM)1234beyblade Wrote: I feel free to post below

Da la huya.

But awesome post Kei! Toranto tournaments has always so much to learn and your post always inspire me to keep trying different comninations and improve my arasenal.
(Jul. 30, 2017  6:06 AM)FIREFIRE CPB Wrote: But awesome post Kei! Toranto tournaments has always so much to learn and your post always inspire me to keep trying different comninations and improve my arasenal.

Thank you! Glad to hear it.
Drain fafnir needs to be banned it literally being spammed every tournament
I feel your pain with trying new stuff to break the monotony of the current meta only to have it blow (or burst heh) in your face. Even when stuff works in testing sometimes the tournament environment changes the outcome.

Does Stationary L2 work for you guys ? It doesn't fare too well against revolve variants of dF and Neptune but I've had success with it against dF.P.At.

Thanks again for another informative report. I'll have one up from my last tournament soon Smile
(Jul. 31, 2017  8:58 PM)Red Eye Wrote: Drain fafnir needs to be banned it literally being spammed every tournament

Maybe it does need to be banned (although I think Atomic and mG could be better targets, if anything), but I also think people need to stop defaulting to "ban it" so soon after a good part comes out, while new hard counters are still being discovered, and while new releases like Maximum Garudas seem to stand up to it.

It's good that we are all aware of the power something like dF holds, but we should also take a few moments and at least attempt to dive deeper into what could counter it. The only way this can happen in a meaningful way is to not ban it immediately and let the metagame play itself out in real tournaments.

Let's not be hasty.

(Jul. 31, 2017  10:17 PM)Basedsamuraij Wrote: I feel your pain with trying new stuff to break the monotony of the current meta only to have it blow (or burst heh) in your face. Even when stuff works in testing sometimes the tournament environment changes the outcome.

Does Stationary L2 work for you guys ? It doesn't fare too well against revolve variants of dF and Neptune but I've had success with it against dF.P.At.

Thanks again for another informative report. I'll have one up from my last tournament soon Smile

Yeah, absolutely. I'm upset when it doesn't end up working out, but I also don't let myself get too down for trying to be different enough to have an edge over what will be commonly used. Sometimes you just don't know unless you try in a real tournament. If you succeed great, if you don't, back to the drawing board.

Hm, I haven't tried it too much. How does it beat dF.P.At?

Awesome! Looking forward to it.
Nice post, if I someday move to anywhere close to where you organize tournaments I would be glad to go!
(Aug. 12, 2017  2:30 PM)aggregor941 Wrote: Nice post, if I someday move to anywhere close to where you organize tournaments I would be glad to go!

Thanks!

Also, just edited your post; no need to quote the entire report! Haha.
(Aug. 12, 2017  6:40 PM)Kei Wrote:
(Aug. 12, 2017  2:30 PM)aggregor941 Wrote: Nice post, if I someday move to anywhere close to where you organize tournaments I would be glad to go!

Thanks!

Also, just edited your post; no need to quote the entire report! Haha.

Ok, haha