Why do people care about “foggy plastic”? and Hasbro’s quality of beys?

I honestly don’t care how my beyblade looks since they’re mostly used for battling either way, because that’s why I buy them
also idk why people complain about the looks considering most of the time tt’s beys break or crack and hasbros just get like a dent because of the plastic
Foggy plastic is not only an aesthetic problem but also possible signs that the foggy plastic is prone to dent or even chip
(Jul. 22, 2018  8:18 PM)brandbrick Wrote: I honestly don’t care how my beyblade looks since they’re mostly used for battling either way, because that’s why I buy them
also idk why people complain about the looks considering most of the time tt’s beys break or crack and hasbros just get like a dent because of the plastic

Because some people are collectors and care about the aesthetics, people don't like denting and white marks on their clear plastics (it is admittedly better than cracks though), and some would like to have the products have a comparable pleasing aesthetics the TT ones have.

But I will say it gets hated too much, I find it to be kind of ugly but not a really big deal. I generally don't care for Hasbro aesthetics as much as they never feel as genuine to me in the first place, even if it is.
The foggy plastic looks cheaply done, and that's one reason why it's not liked all too much. It looks inauthentic and fake, even though it's not.

I've also had TT beys for ages, and not even my oldest parts have significant damage barring my oldest Survive driver, which has a crack near the spring lock because, you know, it's been in hard use for years on end. I've never gotten this whole "TT beys are prone to breaking" thing tbh, and think it just gets thrown around because any sign that a TT bey can break gets thrown and spread around until everyone gets overly concerned about it, even when it only happens once. I still remember people going "Archer Hercules is super breakable!" when a pic got shown in the thread of a broken aH layer, even though it's never happened again to my knowledge and has been written off as a fluke.
(Jul. 22, 2018  8:31 PM)MagikHorse Wrote: The foggy plastic looks cheaply done, and that's one reason why it's not liked all too much. It looks inauthentic and fake, even though it's not.

I've also had TT beys for ages, and not even my oldest parts have significant damage barring my oldest Survive driver, which has a crack near the spring lock because, you know, it's been in hard use for years on end. I've never gotten this whole "TT beys are prone to breaking" thing tbh, and think it just gets thrown around because any sign that a TT bey can break gets thrown and spread around until everyone gets overly concerned about it, even when it only happens once. I still remember people going "Archer Hercules is super breakable!" when a pic got shown in the thread of a broken aH layer, even though it's never happened again to my knowledge and has been written off as a fluke.

TT’s Inferno Ifrit ( Orange Ver) and earlier on with their Victory Valkyrie..
The only example of TT beyblades where the clear part of the layer having durability issues was usually Dark Deathscyther, where as I2 and V2 were because of the solid plastic, something people don't tend to have a problem with aesthetic wise with Hasbro.
It is true that play value might be more important than aesthetics, still there is one big reason for me personally. And it is one aspect Hasbro doesn't seem to understand. The Beyblade anime was created to sell the actual beyblade tops/toys. And with Hasbro there is sometimes a big gap between what is shown in the anime and what is sold in stores.

If I see Nova Nepstrius change modes from attack to stamina, I would expect the toy to be able to do the same. If Wild Wyvron is able to lower the friction on the stadium floor due to its Orbit tip, I wouldn't expect Massive on the actual product. I wouldn't expect Roktavor to have a blue driver, Strike God Valtryek to not have locked wings and the regular Reboot, Twin Nemesis to have 2 instead of the 3 disc & Hit frame.
It might be just me, but if I have a character I like a lot in the anime, I would love to have exactly his beyblade that was shown to me before.

Other things have been mentioned already, general aesthetics that let good products (performance/durability) look like cheap fake toys etc.
Quality is a broad term. I'd say the bey's quality is really good, they just look extremely odd in some cases.
It comes down to the reason of purchase. If you're a collector, or if you own TT Beyblades, Hasbro's choices can be frustrating. Switch Strike is a huge step up from this (Spryzen Requiem S3 and Regulus R3 are so damn nice!) but a good amount of the original Burst releases felt cheap and disposable. In fact, when I was first introduced to Beyblades late last year, I thought Hasbro's were fake (good times!).
I think some people are off-put by what they see on the screen/anime compared to what they receive. The undeniably disgusting hotrod/neon puke colors they had on the earlier releases were atrocious. I prefer the clearer plastic of Takara Tomy because it has a nice sheen on it that makes it much more lively and dynamic when viewed in person and in my photography of it.

"Foggy plastic" is a byproduct of Hasbro's "arguably more durable plastic," which is due to their more flexible-compositions. The white dent aesthetic is really ugly though. A bigger reason for this plastic choice is probably from the rules set by Safety Regulations from various governing bodies. Certain plastic mixes lead to less shattering, less harm to children and people, and less health impact. In addition,  they probably have formulas/material readily available en masse. Sometimes though, marketing research and their designer's personal aesthetic gets the better of them and they create something completely derivative of what the audience really wants... and you end up with this:

[Image: 25015521_1403189869791271_453435588817715200_n.jpg]
I mean then again, would you rather have your more anime accurate beyblade break, (such as a wing on VV), or just deal with the slight fog in the plastic? I don’t know about you guys, but I use my stuff as long as I can to save money for the future.
As others have stated, some of us are collectors and the aesthetics play a large factor into whether we choose to purchase or not. Some people may not worry about breaks if they're display pieces never to be used. Personally, I greatly prefer anime accurate most of the time because I'm a fan of the character(s). I collect and use, so I usually end up with two or more copies of the bey, depending on parts.

Keep in mind that many have limited budgets, therefore spending on beys that just don't do anything for the person would be money needlessly spent to them. What looks good and works for one may not be viable for another. We all have our reasons for buying/not buying. Neither are inherently wrong. Just different priorities, and collectors shouldn't be judged for that—the same way those who only care for competitive play shouldn't be judged for their preferences either. Smile
My son is really sensitive about how Beys look, while I really just care about how they battle. It really has everything to do with just personal preference and why you collect.
I have noticed that the Switchstrike beys can absorb impacts a little better because of the different plastic, and the slopes help, but I think TT still has the advantage on just a better bey formula overall. And accuracy to the anime is always nice. There are some competitive parts that are just much better in TT in my opinion, so that's why I prefer TT for Burst.
(Nov. 29, 2018  10:28 PM)OCTOJOHN Wrote: Foggy plastic is bad quality control return immediately to target

It really isn’t though. Bad quality control would be having a deformed Victory Valkyrie or a fake bey, and foggy plastic is neither of those things, it is a safer and cheaper plastic that performs just as well
This thread has not aged well considering Hasbro's recent choices for Beyblade Burst Turbo. YIKES
Actually, Hasbro plastic is way more durable, at least for me. My TT beys chip in battle, but the only way I could get my Wyvron W2 to show any signs of use is when it got run over by a car and broke. My Spryzen S2 was hammered so much before it even scratched (long story).
everything about hasbro beyblades is cheaped out and half baked

the cheap hasbro plastic is just another example

the select few in this thread claiming cheap plastic has “advantages” are hilarious
it looks yucc

just a thought
Apparently, only parts made out of PMMA turn foggy like the blue plastic on Sieg Xcalibur, and also possibly all of the frames. I managed to somewhat solve this by following the steps in this website:
http://www.tfw2005.com/boards/threads/ho...ks.517231/

It is very dangerous as it requires holding a lighter. I accidentally lit part of my Meteor frame on fire trying to do this, but managed to get rid of the white in the rest of the frame except for the burnt part, but there is still small scratches and chips.