Safety on the WBO


I had to make note of this since it has been a recurring thing.

I visit the WBO to check how things are going in the community every couple of months, just because of the amount of time I used to spend here when I was younger. Upon my return, I can count on seeing several (in once case, roughly a dozen) new messages, all from members wanting to "meet up", "get together", etc. Though this may be in good faith, there's a major problem for the now average minor member who sees no harm in getting together with someone they do not know.

Where the main problem lies is that I barely visit, so the obvious and logical conclusion is that people near me are finding my approximate West Coast location from the member map. Well, they're not all on the West Coast; I often see messages from people scattered across the US & other countries asking me if I can or want to meet up, and sometimes even going so far as to pre-determine a location for said meet up.

There isn't much I can foresee the WBO doing to regulate this, but I thought it was worthy of being brought up, and to see if anyone else (possibly more active members) were seeing the same type of activity.

Frank
Deikailo
There's a difference between people who are actually serious and people who thinks this is the show where people will fly to different countries to play spinning tops. As far as I know, only Indonesia and I are that crazy enough to do this.
Well, the point wasn't their intention to fly to the US to play spinning tops with me, it was the lack of rhyme or reason in the people who they were willing to extend themselves to.

I don't know, I suppose it wasn't really worth bring up, but I thought I'd see what other members had to say nonetheless.

Frank
Kai-V
People often challenge me in private messages but they have no idea that Canada is not their country, and that even if it was, they probably do not live in my province. Kids just have no notion of space : they think somehow I will fly to them.
Deikailo
(Oct. 14, 2011  4:27 AM)Kai-V Wrote: People often challenge me in private messages but they have no idea that Canada is not their country, and that even if it was, they probably do not live in my province. Kids just have no notion of space : they think somehow I will fly to them.
I get this, too, but it's fairly obvious why kids would think that I have the ability to fly/drive to them...because I kind of did at the time.
Arupaeo
I think that promoting safe online behavior could be incorporated into some of the WBO's advice for members, and I think there is a real need for it as well. Yesterday marked the 5th conversation I've had with a parent who had created an account for their child using the child's real name as their username!

There is absolutely a need for anonymity on some parts of the Internet - and a site populated by young minors is absolutely one of those places - but some parents have never been in a chat room or on a message board, or just haven't given these types of issues much thought. If we can help out here I think it would be nice to do so, and I personally feel a moral and ethical obligation to do so when I see at-risk behaviors.

As much as we love the game and wish to believe the best in humanity, statistics on the Internet tell us that sometimes an invitation to meet up is not just innocent, or done by misguided children who can't locate North America on a map. I'm not at all implying anything about our site specifically or our fellow bladers, I just think that online safety in general is important enough to warrant our attention and our support.
Kai-V
(Oct. 14, 2011  4:51 AM)Arupaeo Wrote: I think that promoting safe online behavior could be incorporated into some of the WBO's advice for members, and I think there is a real need for it as well. Yesterday marked the 5th conversation I've had with a parent who had created an account for their child using the child's real name as their username!

There is absolutely a need for anonymity on some parts of the Internet - and a site populated by young minors is absolutely one of those places - but some parents have never been in a chat room or on a message board, or just haven't given these types of issues much thought. If we can help out here I think it would be nice to do so, and I personally feel a moral and ethical obligation to do so when I see at-risk behaviors.

As much as we love the game and wish to believe the best in humanity, statistics on the Internet tell us that sometimes an invitation to meet up is not just innocent, or done by misguided children who can't locate North America on a map. I'm not at all implying anything about our site specifically or our fellow bladers, I just think that online safety in general is important enough to warrant our attention and our support.

I barely see usernames influenced by a real name. In fact, this might be the only good point about BeybladeBattles.com : everyone there is forced to have a given combination with a fixed set of names which are Beyblade parts, and when kids come over to our site, they are so used to their username on BeybladeBattles.com that they use it here too.

The fact that seemingly nothing happened to anyone here yet should be a good part though. Of course, it does not mean that nothing could ever happen and it would be a disaster if it did, so prevention is really not something to neglect, but it is also already good that, even without much prevention except the selection of the hosts, there have not been any incidents.
drakio
I get thease sort of messages too, but most of them come from posting on the "introduce yourself" threads, but you have to think in a little kid's mind, most of them don't even know about the dangers of the world. They think that everyone is friendly and I am sure that everyone on here is friendly and would never do anything twisted. The kids are just excited to battle other people. But I agree with everyone on this thread and thank you Aikemi for raising some awarness on this topic.
I actually have always been a bit cautious of this-and a bit guilty. I felt no problem with posting my age, and now I kinda wish I hadn't Uncertain. Not that something really will happen (It may, but this is a spinning top website). It's just...people have to be cautious. You never know, and safety is definitely a good thing to think about. Maybe not really posting your age (BIRTHDAY THREAD-Erm, not sure what to do other than only say "It's my b-day!") unless you're over 18, and making sure your parents at least are with you if you go to visit someone.
drakio
I don't think that posting your age is not a safe thing. Thats not the real problem, it's the kids giving away thier hous adress, you have to remember to that we have a lot of guest here to, and they can read just about all of the things that we can read. Most of this revealing of their address is during pm, but I have seen some addresses on "introduce yourself". Parents just need to watch what their kids post, for kids 11 and below need to have their parents check and make sure that they are not putting them selves into danger.

I also feel the the forums ask almost too private questions sometime, I haven't seen any on here but on other forums I have.
I honestly think this is a far-fetched issue, not even an issue.

I do not think anyone's parents would even let that happen..
Deikailo
I've been posting my address, full name, and age on the internet since I was like 14. I have never had anyone try to track me down. Most child abductors are too lazy to cross states to pick up one kid. (True facts)

Although, it's definitely reassuring to know that I only posted one of the 2 possible addresses I was staying at and the address had multiple entries so anyone who even thought about coming over would have to decide how to enter. Surely they would not pick the door with the snarling German Shepherd. (my apartment)

The important thing is to not really trust anyone who is immediately overly interested in you. Past that, Beyblade forums spawning under Brad have been very safe for years.
Mickey
Well, when you make an event proposal, it has to get approved by mods. So, if some person just made an account and decided to make a fake tourney, well, we know nothing about them, they only have 1 post, and it's the attempted event proposal that's going to get denied. But, one time at a tournament, there were these joggers that saw what we were doing and decided to record us because they find it "funny". Now, my question is, should tournament holders be responsible if the participant gets in danger whatsoever?

Now I'm scared to take a bus to the next beyblade tournament.
BeybladeStation
Name one case where we've had a user with 1 post who made a successful tourney.
Mickey
No one, I was just using that as an example.
Deikailo
(Oct. 15, 2011  1:19 AM)Cookies^^ Wrote: Now, my question is, should tournament holders be responsible if the participant gets in danger whatsoever?
This depends on your country and state. For example, if someone were to get hurt at an event I host, their parent could turn around and sue me for everything I own and everything that I will eventually own and earn as I have no insurance for my event.
Dan
Other than the fact that Cookies said in his post "we know nothing about them, they only have 1 post, and it's the attempted event proposal that's going to get denied."
I'll humor your request: Brad.
Arupaeo
(Oct. 15, 2011  1:19 AM)Cookies^^ Wrote: Well, when you make an event proposal, it has to get approved by mods. So, if some person just made an account and decided to make a fake tourney, well, we know nothing about them, they only have 1 post, and it's the attempted event proposal that's going to get denied. But, one time at a tournament, there were these joggers that saw what we were doing and decided to record us because they find it "funny". Now, my question is, should tournament holders be responsible if the participant gets in danger whatsoever?

Now I'm scared to take a bus to the next beyblade tournament.

Clearly not. Tournament organizers are not taking minors into their custody or into their homes. In a public place (or privately owned establishment not controlled by the organizer), each minor is still the responsibility of their parent or guardian.
Deikailo
(Oct. 15, 2011  1:25 AM)Arupaeo Wrote: Clearly not. Tournament organizers are not taking minors into their custody or into their homes. In a public place (or privately owned establishment not controlled by the organizer), each minor is still the responsibility of their parent or guardian.
Unfortunately, this is not at all true in the US. I don't know the laws verbatum, but in most instances, you need insurance to run large events, especially with minors.
Mickey
(Oct. 15, 2011  1:25 AM)Arupaeo Wrote:
(Oct. 15, 2011  1:19 AM)Cookies^^ Wrote:

Clearly not. Tournament organizers are not taking minors into their custody or into their homes. In a public place (or privately owned establishment not controlled by the organizer), each minor is still the responsibility of their parent or guardian.

We know they won't. I'm talking about people who joined the day before making the thread.
BeybladeStation
Why not make it clear then to enter that the parent is responsible?

You cannot fight something you agreed to.
Hov
Usually I show my mom how to deal dramas on this site most of the time. Its true actually. I've shown her the rants from the Welcom Back thread, Suggestion thread between me and deikailo. How to deal with situations and simplify it. All for safety. She once said "This is online, people can do anything they want to because they feel big behind the computer, dont let anyone from this (WBO) let you down ." Grin
Deikailo
(Oct. 15, 2011  1:34 AM)BeybladeStation Wrote: Why not make it clear then to enter that the parent is responsible?

You cannot fight something you agreed to.
You can have then signing a legal document stating that the host is not liable, but they will somehow find a way to sue you. When I was judging at Hasbro's New Jersey qualifier, the organizers were explaining to me the importance of insurance in an event.
(Oct. 15, 2011  1:51 AM)® Wrote: Usually I show my mom how to deal dramas on this site most of the time. Its true actually. I've shown her the rants from the Welcom Back thread, Suggestion thread between me and deikailo. How to deal with situations and simplify it. All for safety. She once said "This is online, people can do anything they want to because they feel big behind the computer, dont let anyone from this (WBO) let you down ." Grin

I'm genuinely not sure what this has to do with the thread topic, or safety of any kind, aside from "emotional security"...

(Oct. 15, 2011  1:34 AM)BeybladeStation Wrote: Why not make it clear then to enter that the parent is responsible?

You cannot fight something you agreed to.

That's just poor form, really. It's not going to make the parents, or anyone else for that matter, feel any better that you're signing over all responsibility for anything that happens at your event. The host should be held responsible for anything that occurs on the grounds of the event. To and from, however, is not really in any way their business or liability.
Kai-V
In terms of safety of one kid, I think the biggest and almost only danger is if they challenge someone directly and arrange a meet-up with only one person. This is why we encourage tournaments a lot : you are a lot safer with at least eight people around you, even if they are also strangers.


We had an event where a kid threw a huge tantrum just for losing a match and he ended up trying to get himself killed on the street; apparently his parent was there somewhere, but I do not see how anyone could possibly be blamed or sued for whatever could have happened, it was that kid's own stupidity and obvious lack of "socially-able" behaviour that could have caused drama.