History of Beyblade

:kai: I managed to find out a couple a things about Beyblade in the past week
I'd like to share with you guys

Beyblades first went on sale in July 1999, and a comic about kids who play with them began to appear in a comics magazine at about the same time. A related video game was also released for Nintendo's GameBoy . But what really set off the boom was a TV cartoon series that began airing in January 2001. Since then, the manufacturer of Beyblades has had difficulty keeping up with the demand, and toy stores and supermarkets across Japan have been selling out of these hot products. Some people have had to stand in line for three hours to buy them!

Beyblades are modeled after a similar type of top, called beigoma, that was popular as a children's toy beginning in the seventeenth century. Beigoma were originally made by filling spiral seashells with sand and melted lead, but at the beginning of the twentieth century they came to be made out of cast iron. They gradually lost their popularity, however, as various new toys and games began to appear after World War II. Today there is only one factory in all of Japan that still makes these tops.

Beigoma are usually spun on matting spread across the top of a barrel and indented at the center. Two players spin their tops at the same time and try to knock the opponent's top out of the ring--the same as Beyblades. The way the tops are spun is quite different, however. A beigoma is spun using a 60-centimeter (2-foot) cotton cord. Because a beigoma doesn't have a stem, it takes skill to wrap the cord around the toy. Beyblades, on the other hand, are spun with launching a shooter, making it easy for anyone to spin the tops and enjoy playing with Beyblades.

Thanks to the popularity of Beyblades, beigoma have been making a comeback from a decades-long slump that almost left them extinct. Japan's only maker of beigoma has seen orders for these tops nearly double since the appearance of Beyblades. Some schools have introduced beigoma as an extracurricular activity, and one school has even held a schoolwide beigoma tournament.


(USER WAS WARNED FOR THIS POST)

Plagiarism. You can see the original article here: http://web-japan.org/kidsweb/archives/co...lades.html



Bet you didn't know that leave your comments.
Actually, I'm willing to bet almost all of us knew that. Wink

Also, you better link your source before you get a warning for stealing.
I found this out from beyblade mags lol
where did you get beyblade mags with that detailed info? In the past week?
http://web-japan.org/kidsweb/archives/co...lades.html

Liar. I knew where this article was from because I've read it before. Enjoy your warning!
I think everyone knows this already .O.o
(Jan. 30, 2009  7:37 PM)EverlastingBlader Wrote: Beyblade had a Magazine? Since when?

Beyblade had a comic that just had screen shots of the cartoon with added speech bubbles. At least in the UK.
It also had random trivia packed in. Nothing special, the same as most comics developed after a cartoon that a network wanted to milk for all it's worth.

Anyway, this whole beigoma thing is pretty common knowledge amongst most Beybladers.
I have a beigoma. Though it's made out of wood and it was made in Italy. lol. I tried really hard to spin it with the long string for a long time, but I only ever succeeded once or twice.
Ah! I have a beigoma, but I suck at using it XD
I had read this before when I was writing a speech on the History of Beyblade's for school.
It's all pretty interesting
yea..i kinda knew this already too...ive read that article long time ago as well from the same source brad put up there.
i know this is off subject but they should have a yo-yo baed anime but beyblades are awesome
(Jan. 31, 2009  6:53 PM)redace01 Wrote: i know this is off subject but they should have a yo-yo baed anime but beyblades are awesome

http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/encyclop...hp?id=1276
(Jul. 28, 2019  12:52 PM)Emperor 1 Wrote: Now i know more about bey blades

Please do not pull up threads that have been dead for over 10 years. Necroposting (the act of responding to a long dead thread) is highly frowned upon outside of certain circumstances, especially for silly comments like this.