World Beyblade Organization by Fighting Spirits Inc.

Full Version: Cleaning beyblades
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
What is the best way to clean the metal of beyblades? After a bit of use the metal on my beyblades start to get dirty. I can't figure out how to clean them.
Take a wet cloth, then rub it on your metal. I don’t know, if it works, because I am going to clean mine in 5 minutes.

(Oct. 12, 2020  11:38 PM)FrostFafnir Wrote: [ -> ]What is the best way to clean the metal of beyblades? After a bit of use the metal on my beyblades start to get dirty. I can't figure out how to clean them.

Take a wet cloth, then rub it on your metal. I don’t know, if it works, because I am going to clean mine in 5 minutes.
(Oct. 12, 2020  11:38 PM)FrostFafnir Wrote: [ -> ]What is the best way to clean the metal of beyblades? After a bit of use the metal on my beyblades start to get dirty. I can't figure out how to clean them.

just clean without water or it makes the metal foggy
I left my beys out side in the rain(under roof tho) Anything I can do to save them?
(Oct. 12, 2020  11:46 PM)The Blacknight Wrote: [ -> ]I left my beys out side in the rain(under roof tho) Anything I can do to save them?

if they got wet its bad. if there dry just try a clean cloth
(Oct. 12, 2020  11:38 PM)FrostFafnir Wrote: [ -> ]What is the best way to clean the metal of beyblades? After a bit of use the metal on my beyblades start to get dirty. I can't figure out how to clean them.

The metal on Beyblades is a zinc-based alloy, so you shouldn't worry too much if they get wet or start to look dull or dirty after a while. This is just natural tarnishing, the metals oxidizing slowly in the air. It's not going to come off no matter how you try to clean it, it's actually a part of your metal part now unlike dust, dirt, or other things you might be able to clean off with a little soap and water. Water may speed the tarnishing process up a bit, but don't worry because it won't cause any actual harm to your part. Tarnished metal parts may look uglier and dirtier, but there's no significant difference between a brand new shiny disk and an old tarnished one, and just being wet at some point doesn't make it any worse either.

If you really want to bring the shine back out though, you can use a metal polish to clean your parts (make sure you follow the instructions for your polish). I know Shindog recommended Mother's Polish to do this with once, and though I haven't tried it myself I've heard good things about it as a residue-free way to clean them up and restore their original shine. Other polishes are available and can do the job too, so look around.

Keep in mind that any sort of polish that leaves residue behind will make the disk tournament illegal (it's a foreign substance added to the disk, which is against WBO guidelines. Won't stop you from playing with your friends with it though). I'd suggest treating a polish you're unfamiliar with like you would paint: try a little bit in the corner of something that doesn't matter much to you and see how it works before slathering it on all your parts, just to make sure it doesn't do anything weird.
As Magik said, the metals on Beyblade WILL slowly tarnish over time. The best way to make them shiny again is to use polish.

Just keep in mind that Polishing a disk is not a process like removing dirt, it is actually scraping off the outer layer of the tarnished disk to reveal the newer, still shiny inside part. It also wont stop the disk from getting tarnished all over again.

For those who do not have access to a polish, and having some DIY spirit, there's also a method similar to removing tarnish from silver cutleries. It uses alumunium foil, salt, vinegar, and hot water. There's a lot of instructions on Google, but I can say from experience that the process is tedious and the result is not as great as simply using polish.

Since there is no way to keep the metals from tarnishing, you can simply accept it. Maybe think of it as the mark of your playtime with the part.

If you REALLY want to keep the metal parts shiny as long as possible, I guess you can coat it in some silicone protective coat. Obviously that means its no longer usable to play in a tournament since it is an addition of a foreign substance (using it to play will likely strip off the silicone coating anyway) so its gonna spend its life in the display case.
I take the small silica gel or oxygen absorber packets from dried food packaging, clean them & leave them in the lunchboxes/containers where I store my beyblades layers & disks...I have actually found that the metal parts start to get lighter in colour over a few weeks, though not exactly shiny. It certainly keeps them from oxidising further & somewhat reverses the rusting.

You might wanna check this rubber eraser method (click on link below) out if u r after shiny (I haven't tried this myself but maybe it's tournament legal too?):

https://youtu.be/MYQe3x4ADnc

Another possibly tournament legal (no residue) interesting cleaning video (eraser, toothpaste & rubbing alcohol - ppl seem to say the latter 2 methods are a lot quicker than using the eraser):

https://youtu.be/9sjJTH1M15I
You shouldn’t polish the metal as you’re actually removing material which hinders balance
(Oct. 15, 2020  10:06 PM)UltimateSaizo Wrote: [ -> ]You shouldn’t polish the metal as you’re actually removing material which hinders balance

You’re only polishing the part that was outside
For example let’s say you have a painted black outer disc
Then it gets dirty and turns brown. You keep taking the brown stuff off until the disc is completely black again.and don’t touch the black part. Plus if you’re polishing a bey you’re only taking of the dirty stuff. Do you really think metal will come off if you polish it?
I tend to only restore or deep clean metal wheels/burst discs if I buy or trade them used, just so that any oxidation is from my own experience with them.  Something I found that works pretty well is actually I product I use to clean my cars' exterior (metal/body work) with.  Turtle Wax brand "Rubbing Compound" Heavy Duty Cleaner is pretty good at getting a residue free removal of oxidation from a Bey.  Requires a little bit more work with a paper towel or microfiber cloth but I like the results that I've gotten from it.  Was gonna buy some metal polish before but apparently what I had on hand already wasn't a bad choice.

Used Hasbro Burn Phoenix Before & After
That’s what polishing is it’s removing imperfections and the dulling of metal is corrosion
(Oct. 15, 2020  11:13 PM)BreakerDS Wrote: [ -> ]I tend to only restore or deep clean metal wheels/burst discs if I buy or trade them used, just so that any oxidation is from my own experience with them.  Something I found that works pretty well is actually I product I use to clean my cars' exterior (metal/body work) with.  Turtle Wax brand "Rubbing Compound" Heavy Duty Cleaner is pretty good at getting a residue free removal of oxidation from a Bey.  Requires a little bit more work with a paper towel or microfiber cloth but I like the results that I've gotten from it.  Was gonna buy some metal polish before but apparently what I had on hand already wasn't a bad choice.

Used Hasbro Burn Phoenix Before & After
 
I know I'm late but can you explain the process in which you do it? I'm trying to clean some of my old MFB stuff and could use some guidance
Get some disposable gloves and some paper towels and/or cloth towels. Put the gloves on and fold the towel several times, then use the towel to wipe up some of the compound on to itself. Apply the compound to the metal wheel and manually buff/clean it, using as much force as you want to. You’ll know you’re making progress when you see that the towel and compound start taking on a black color; the oxidation from the metal wheel. If the towel gets too black or frayed, repeat the process as much as you want with a new paper towel or a cleaner side of the cloth towel. Once you’re happy with the resulting shine, run the wheel with water to remove any excess compound and then buff/dry the wheel with a clean paper/cloth towel.
(Nov. 21, 2020  11:45 PM)BreakerDS Wrote: [ -> ]Get some disposable gloves and some paper towels and/or cloth towels.  Put the gloves on and fold the towel several times, then use the towel to wipe up some of the compound on to itself.  Apply the compound to the metal wheel and manually buff/clean it, using as much force as you want to.  You’ll know you’re making progress when you see that the towel and compound start taking on a black color; the oxidation from the metal wheel.  If the towel gets too black or frayed, repeat the process as much as you want with a new paper towel or a cleaner side of the cloth towel.  Once you’re happy with the resulting shine, run the wheel with water to remove any excess compound and then buff/dry the wheel with a clean paper/cloth towel.

Appreciate It man! Thanks!
I just received my "Mother's" polish in the mail yesterday. You can snag it on Amazon for like $8, delivered in two days with prime delivery.
I'm curious on cleaning the metal ball on tips like Orbit and Yard Metal in case they might rust, any tips?
(Dec. 09, 2020  9:31 AM)BBGUSA Wrote: [ -> ]I'm curious on cleaning the metal ball on tips like Orbit and Yard Metal in case they might rust, any tips?

Thats easy use an old toothbrush
(Dec. 20, 2020  3:41 AM)JacobofDeath Wrote: [ -> ]
(Dec. 09, 2020  9:31 AM)BBGUSA Wrote: [ -> ]I'm curious on cleaning the metal ball on tips like Orbit and Yard Metal in case they might rust, any tips?

Thats easy use an old toothbrush

Really I didn't think that would work I might have to get it try thanks for the advice.

(Oct. 12, 2020  11:46 PM)The Blacknight Wrote: [ -> ]I left my beys out side in the rain(under roof tho) Anything I can do to save them?

Can you give more details for what exactly happened with your beyblades I might be able to help out better that way?

(Oct. 15, 2020  11:20 PM)UltimateSaizo Wrote: [ -> ]That’s what polishing is it’s removing imperfections and the dulling of metal is corrosion

Any advice on brands of polish I should get if I wanted to make my beyblades shine again.
(Dec. 20, 2020  9:08 AM)jonathan53332 Wrote: [ -> ]
(Dec. 20, 2020  3:41 AM)JacobofDeath Wrote: [ -> ]Thats easy use an old toothbrush

Really I didn't think that would work I might have to get it try thanks for the advice.

(Oct. 12, 2020  11:46 PM)The Blacknight Wrote: [ -> ]I left my beys out side in the rain(under roof tho) Anything I can do to save them?

Can you give more details for what exactly happened with your beyblades I might be able to help out better that way?

(Oct. 15, 2020  11:20 PM)UltimateSaizo Wrote: [ -> ]That’s what polishing is it’s removing imperfections and the dulling of metal is corrosion

Any advice on brands of polish I should get if I wanted to make my beyblades shine again.

ehhh its fine, old post, they wore off with time
Odd question, but how does one fix a paradox frame with slightly raised metal?
(Dec. 23, 2020  2:12 AM)BBGUSA Wrote: [ -> ]Odd question, but how does one fix a paradox frame with slightly raised metal?

Not really on the right topic, but if you can't push it back down by hand then I'm not sure what else can really be done there. Just sounds broken to me.
WD40, Metal Polish, Isopoyle Alcohol on the metal parts, and a damp cloth on the plastic parts.
Possibly a little out of bounds for most due to tools and safety, I've got a bench grinder with 150mm 3x stages of polishing mops fitted to it and a deburring wheel.
It's a messy task and requires a lot of care with fingers but gives great results like in the video below if done with the correct grades of wheels and compounds without as much effort as you would rubbing it by hand.

The part below is stainless steel but my zinc weights I have tried come up just as shiny and smooth with the same tools, any detailed areas are tricky and risk losing their detail if repeated.

There are other "industrial" ways too, a vibrating bowl with different types of media in which rub against parts and gradually polish them too.